In her new memoir, “Driven To Succeed: Lessons Learned Through Faith, Family & Favor”, Dr. Hattie N. Washington reveals how a country girl, from the backwoods of Meherrin, Virginia, succeeded through life with optimism, “drive”, and a belief in God to become an honor student, a master teacher, a parent to two successful daughters (a physician and an attorney), and a foster parent to numerous abused foster boys over twenty-two years.

She writes about family, relationships, and the complexities of growing up during the segregation and desegregation era, where the strike at R.R. Moton High School, in Farmville, Virginia in 1951, led to the historic Brown v. Board of Education landmark case.  Her strong faith and high self-expectation shine through despite her two-room elemen-tary schoolhouse in Prince Edward County, VA closing in 1959 due to Virginia's massive resistance to the Brown v. Board of Education desegregation/civil rights landmark case.

You will read about how an ongoing series of personal setbacks brought on many stumbling blocks, yet she broke down barriers to complete her high school and college education; and made history by becoming the first female vice president of Coppin State University.  She shares the long journey of starting a non-profit boys’ home in Maryland for abused foster boys with special educational needs, named Aunt Hattie’s Place, whose young men affectionately calls her "Aunt Hattie".

She also discloses personal sacrifices and her dark family secrets that overflow with wisdom, lessons learned, and a call to action. Her riveting memoir is complete with historical and personal photographs of her life’s journey that provide inspiration for generations to come. 

Search

translation missing: en.general.search.loading